Thesedays managing cloud should be somethining that is well automated and what you can be really comfortable with. Microsoft Azure when using Azure Resource Manager allows you to manage infrastructure via APIs or via Powershell (which is calling webApis then ).

I have to say that both of the approaches are quite nice. I have already worked some time ago on ARM json templates ( using Visual Studio Addon ) and they enable you to perform advanced operations in declarative way.

Good news is that we can also do that with Powershell as well. I’m aware that all over internet you can find ready scripts that will do deployments with a click of a button 🙂 but it goes about excercising 🙂 as thats how we learn.

First what you should make sure of is that you have Azure Powershell module installed. For now I always have been using WebPlatform installer . Once installed you should have it listed when query for modules

 

With the above being prerequisite we can continue and go further with our excercise. Our target will be to deploy 4 virtual machines. First of them will become a domain controller and should have static IP address. Remaining will be using dynamic addresses. Also we will not be creating availability groups and we will only have one public IP address ( we will investigate different setup in one of next posts ) which will expose 3389 port for us ( we will be restricting that via security groups altough )

Of course I dont have to remind you that for this you need valid Azure subscription ( but I assume you have one – even trial 🙂  ). The script as a whole is available via github and will be linked by the end of this post.

 

General setup

First we start of with setting up our azure subscription credentials and defining subscription details and amoount of VMs to be created.  Here we start off with getting our credentials (if we would use Azure AD and delegate credentials to newly created user we could pass PScredential object as argument ) . Later on we select one of available subscriptions (we can use out-grid to give enduser option of selecting ).

 

 

 

What is the most important here is the part of switching azure operations mode done with :

This command have been deprecated and will not be available in future! Please take a look at post here for more detailed information!

And since I like to be in control of whats going on I tend to change output to be more verbose on debug side. This is done easily bu specyfying :

 

Create resource group

Within Azure nowadays we have concept of resource groups which are form of “containers” for keeping resources related to each other together. So if we want to create new obects we must start with resource group. Creating of it its quite easy.

 

Through the rest of the post you will see me checking for resources using Test-<typeOfResource> however looking at gitHub shows that some of those are depracated as well. So it migth be that this part will require a bit of rework.

Create storage account

In order to store OS and data disks we must have object within azure. And here we can utilize Azure Storage accounts. For this we create account – but in real life scenario you would just go ahead and use existing one for example.

 

Create virtual networks

In order to have networking running properly you need network. I really like concept of virtual networks and subnets and with this connecting directly with network interfaces and other objects things start to make sense – it all interconnects 🙂

You can see in above that I create 2 subnets. Altough I could get away with one – next one we might use in upcoming posts

 

Create public IP address

As mentioned before – I’m after a really simple set up here. So I will just create single public IP address (and make sure it is resolvable with DNS ) which I will be using later to connect to VMs

 

Create network security group

To provide security we can now define ACLs on objects like subnets / network interfaces which allows us to have granular security. Below I will just create one for remote desktop access (in this example allow from any destination – which is not a good thing in production )

 

Create network interfaces

Now to all connect to each other we create network interfaces. To first interface we will add additionaly our public IP address

 

Provision VMs

And now the time has come to finally provision virtual machines based on resources we got prepared for this.

 

Look at completed action

Once the whole script completes we get direct access to our newly created reources . It looks good and is a worth noting starting point for autoation and orchestration. From here next logical step is to describe how this infrastructure should be configured with DSC and that is something we will do with on of our next posts.

 

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Happy powershelling 🙂

 

 

 

Script in full